Lyndon Johnson: There are lots of gaps in what you learn in school

We recently had a chat with Lyndon Johnson,  radio presenter and recovering broadcast journalist, based in Toronto, Canada. Lyndon told us that he experienced many gaps when he finished his degree in broadcast journalism and landed his first job.

 

Lyndon is British born but lives in Toronto, Canada. In his spare time, he runs, reads and listens to music.

 

 

When did you start working and where?

1993 Chiltern Radio Group

 

Which field?

Broadcasting

 

What knowledge gaps did you experience back then?

There were so many. The primary gap was how to translate what I’d learned in principle into something of value to an employer.  I also learned that there are lots of gaps in what you learn in school – like the finer details of defamation laws.

 

How did you fill these gaps?

I asked questions.  I watched and learned from people with more experience.  I asked for advice and help.

 

Tell us about your first technical challenge

I learned very early in my career to always ensure the microphone was turned off when not in use – and to double check audio before heading back to the newsroom.  I only made the mistake of not checking once.

 

Any other tech anecdote you’d like to share?

I learned very quickly not to touch anything until you understood the implications of doing so in full.  One time I hit the delay button – a button that dumps 7 seconds of audio in the event of profane language or playing the wrong audio.  Working 7 seconds into a radio broadcast takes about 30 minutes and requires a lot of mathematical calculations.

 

Any story to tell?

I’ve always been fascinated by how things work.  I was fascinated by how TV and radio magically appeared on devices in the home, and how such magical sounds appeared from a piece of vinyl on a turntable.  Despite having spent 15 years in and around radio stations I’m still not 100% sure how it works!!

I’m also an early adopter – I owned the first mass-market cellphone in the UK and the first ultralight notebook computer – a Sony VAIO.

 

Share your passion for technology

#Technology allows #broadcasters to get stories to air much more quickly in 2018 than it did in 1993. But, that also comes with risks. Click To Tweet

 

Technology allows broadcasters to get stories to air much more quickly in 2018 than it did in 1993. But, that also comes with risks. From a radio perspective, you can now create broadcast quality audio on devices we all carry around in our pockets. There is now no excuse for not capturing a story.

 

From a #radio perspective, you can now create #broadcast quality audio on devices we all carry around in our pockets. Click To Tweet

 

I use technology in almost everything I do as an entrepreneur.  I’m currently using a Microsoft SurfaceBook and a Samsung Note 8 – where I used to carry around an Uher tape recorder and a notepad.

 

Share your vision for any tech enhancement, future revolution.

I see a future where you can broadcast almost anything to anybody.  You’ll be able to show people the way you experience the world.

 

What’s your personal motto?

Be the best at everything you do.

 

 

 

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